lion killed in Arkansas, 1st since '75

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Emily
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lion killed in Arkansas, 1st since '75

Postby Emily » Sat Nov 15, 2014 8:16 pm

http://www.thv11.com/story/sports/outdo ... 4721/THV11

First mountain lion killed in Arkansas since 1975
AGFC, Press Release 9:16 p.m. CST November 13, 2014
Mountain Lion

(Photo: Keith Stephens, THV11)
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LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AGFC) - A deer hunter shot and killed a 148-pound male mountain lion Saturday morning east of Hermitage in Bradley County.

It's the first time a mountain lion has been killed in Arkansas since 1975 in Logan County.

The hunter, Douglas W. Ramer, 62, of Bastrop, Louisiana, told wildlife officers the mountain lion was moving toward his deer stand and he felt threatened. According to Arkansas Game and Fish Commission regulations, non-game wildlife (except migratory birds and endangered species) that present a reasonable threat to people or property may be shot during daylight hours or trapped without a depredation permit.

Ramer, who was on private property, reported the incident to wildlife officers Wednesday. He has not been charged with violating regulations, although officers are continuing to investigate the incident.

The carcass was given to AGFC biologists. Hair from the mountain lion will be sent to Wildlife Genetics Laboratory in Missoula, Montana, for DNA testing, which often can reveal an animal's area of birth.

Mountain lions - also known as pumas and cougars - lived throughout Arkansas until about 1920. The AGFC offered bounties and hired trappers to control predators during 1927-29. At least 255 wolves and 523 bobcats were killed, but no mountain lions were taken.

Five sightings of mountain lions in Arkansas have been confirmed in the last five years, although a breeding population has not been verified. A few mountain lion sightings in Missouri, Oklahoma and Louisiana also have been confirmed in recent years.

A mountain lion was killed in Montgomery County in 1949 and another in Ashley County in 1969. In late 1998, a team from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock observed tracks, feces and a deer kill from a free-ranging mountain lion across Hot Spring, Garland and Pulaski counties.

(Source: Arkansas Game and Fish Commission)
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Emily
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Re: lion killed in Arkansas, 1st since '75

Postby Emily » Sat Nov 15, 2014 8:18 pm

http://www.viralglobalnews.com/science/ ... /#comments


science, Deer Hunter Shoots Arkansas Mountain Lion Claims Self-Defense
Deer Hunter Shoots Arkansas Mountain Lion Claims Self-Defense
Posted by Frank Bouc on November 13, 2014 in Science | 717 Views | 1 Response

62-year-old Douglas W. Ramer from Louisiana was deer hunting in Arkansas (Bradley county) legally on private property. The hunter was near his deer stand when he caught sight of a mountain lion. Ramer told the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission (AGFC) he feared for his life as the lion walked closer to the stand. The hunter raised his gun and shot the big cat to death. He immediately contacted officials and notified them of the incident. Under hunting regulations, only acceptable game animals can be hunted, but Ramer states he was simply defending himself. Officials have not charged the man with a crime at this time.

In 2013, the AGFC advised of the increased reported sightings of big cats around the area. While the mountain lions have increased in sightings, wildlife officials are unsure if a female cat is roaming for breeding, which could spell trouble for hunters and residents in the area, if paths cross.

On Saturday, Ramer faced off against the big cat when it crossed his path. The hair of the mountain lion is under review with a Montana laboratory to review DNA, and determine where the animal possibly was birthed. The carcass of the cat was turned over to the AGFC. There is a map to track the growing population of the mountain lions also called cougars or pumas. The map depicted from Cougarnet depicts a smaller presence in the south than the west which has a large population of the big cats.

An official for the AGFC, Myron Means, said the agency expects more sightings to be reported, especially with the increase of sightings over the past decade.

The California Department of Fish and Game, who has extensive experience handling encounters with mountain lions, provides excellent tips for residents. They suggest to avoid hiking or running in areas when mountain lions are most active, which is dusk, dawn and twilight hours. They suggest if walking with children, pick them up and never run. Rather face the lion, but do not approach, and make a lot of noise and throw rocks or objects.

The attacks against humans from big cats are extremely rare, but it is best for those traveling or exploring more remote areas to consider the possibility.

Ramer is not being held currently for questioning, but the case remains under investigation. Hunters and residents have the protection of the law if they kill a big cat that poses a reasonable threat, or if the animal encroaches on private property.
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